Meet Octavia the Octopus

What a huggable toy for little ones. I used rainbow yarn for the head/body and made each tentacle in a different colour, but you can also do the entire project in one solid colour. It’s so easy to make, you can complete the whole thing in an evening. The head/body is about 4″ tall (fits in the palm of my hand) and the tentacles are about 6″ long.

Materials:

  • 1 ball of any worsted weight yarn (I used Craftsmart’s Fiesta, for the head/body. Then I just used several different solid colours for the tentacles. It’s a great project for using up scrap yarn.)
  • 8 mm hook
  • Black embroidery floss
  • Fiberfill stuffing for the head/body
  • Yarn needle

Octavia’s head/body:
Ch 4, sl st to make a ring.

Round 1: 6 sc in ring; sl st in first sc to join. (6 sc)

Round 2: 2 sc in each st around; sl st in first sc to join. (12 sc)

Round 3: *sc in first st, 2 sc in next st, repeat from * around; sl st in first sc to join.

Round 4: sc in each of first 2 sts, 2 sc in next st, *sc in each of next 2 sts, 2 sc in next st; rep from * around; sl st in first sc to join.

Round 5: sc in each of first 3 sts, 2 sc in next st, *sc in each of next 3 sts, 2 sc in next st; rep from * around; sl st in first sc to join.

Round 6: sc in each of first 4 sts, 2 sc in next st, *sc in each of next 4 sts, 2 sc in next st; rep from * around; sl st in first sc to join.

Round 7-12: sc in each st around; sl st to first sc to join.

Round 13: (decrease round starts here) *sc in each of next 4 sts, sc2tog; rep from * around; sl st in first sc to join.

Round 14: sc in each st around; sl st to first sc to join.

Round 15: *sc in each of next 3 sts, sc2tog; rep from * around; sl st in first sc to join.

Round 16: sc in each st around; sl st to first sc to join.

Round 17: *sc in each of next 2 sts, sc2tog; rep from * around; sl st in first sc to join.

Round 18: *sc in each of next 2 sts, sc2tog; rep from * around. Stuff with fiberfill.

Round 19: *sc in next st, sc2tog; rep from * around. Do not fasten off (unless you’re changing to a different colour). The head will not yet be completely closed because you need to first crochet the tentacles around the opening, then you will finish by stitching closed what’s left.

Octavia’s tentacles:
Loosely ch 30; sc in second ch from hook, 2 sc in each ch across. When you arrive back at the head, sl st in next st, then ch 30 and repeat for the second tentacle. Repeat the process around until you have 8 tentacles.

Next, use sc2tog to finish closing the open hole, or just use a yarn needle to sl st it together.

Finishing Octavia:
Use the black embroidery thread to embroider on two eyes (big French knots) and a big smiling mouth. I also threaded 6 pieces of yarn at the top of her head and used a ribbon to tie it up in a bow.

She’s ready for cuddling!

Advertisements

Warm up with a crocheted Cocoa Tweed Poncho

I really liked the look of Bernat’s brown tweed yarn, so I picked up 2 skeins and decided they would look good crocheted into a poncho. The yarn was really nice to work with, and it did indeed make a nice-looking finished project!

COCOA TWEED PONCHO
Materials:

2 skeins Bernat Premium Tweeds (7oz/198g/360yds/329m) Chocolate Tweed

8 mm hook

Shell = 3 dc in indicated sp

Note: Make 2 panels using the pattern below. I didn’t bother blocking this project since the yarn didn’t seem to need it.

Panel A:

Ch 60 + 2.

Row 1: sc in second ch from hook, *(sk 2 chs, shell in next, ch 2, sk 2, sc in next), rep from * to end, turn.

Row 2: ch 5, sc in first dc of next shell, *ch 5, sc in first dc of next shell), rep from * to last shell, ch 2, sk 2, dc in last st, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, sc in same st as ch-1, *(shell in next sc, ch 2, sc in third ch of next ch-5 loop), rep from * across, shell in last sc, ch 2, sc in top of beg ch-3, turn.

Repeat Row 2 & 3 consecutively for 34 rows (ending with a Row 3), or until your rectangle is approximately 35” long.

Follow directions for Panel A to create your second rectangle (Panel B).

Construction

With wrong sides facing you, use a yarn needle to whipstitch the panels together as shown by the pink X’s.

Next, with wrong sides still facing you, fold the edge of Panel A over to the side of Panel B as shown by the arrows below. Whipstitch to seam together. When you’ve finished, turn right side out and smooth out into poncho shape.

Neckline

For a cleaner look and a better fit, we’ll make a border around the neckline, working on the right side. Attach yarn with a slip stitch anywhere on the neckline, and do an even row of sc around. Instead of joining when you arrive back at your first sc, use a marker and do continuous rounds so there’s no seam line. Do four more rounds of sc, then fasten off and weave in end.

Bottom Border

Also working on the right side, attach yarn with a slip stitch anywhere on the bottom edge, and do an evenly spaced row of sc right around. Again, use a marker and do continuous rounds for a better-looking finish. I did five rounds of sc for my border, but you can continue with more rounds if you want to make the poncho longer. After five rounds, fasten off and weave in end.

Sparkle Shawl

On one of my many trips to Michael’s, I discovered Lion Brand’s Shawl in a Ball yarn and absolutely fell in love with the metallic versions, particularly “Prism.” The blend of colors immediately brought back visions of exploring undersea reefs during some of my snorkeling adventures in the Caribbean.I knew right away that I wanted to use Prism to make a shawl that I could throw around my shoulders in the evening on my next cruise or beach vacation and—lo and behold!—a perfect mesh-style crocheted shawl pattern was featured on the label, so I just looked it up at Lionbrand.com. It was probably one of the easiest patterns I’ve ever worked on and is perfect for a beginner.If you Google “sparkle shawl,” the pattern comes up in several places, as well as in a PDF that you can just immediately download, but I’ve also provided the instructions for you below, since I used a 6 mm hook instead of the recommended 5 mm hook because I wanted a more substantial shawl.

Now… I’ve got my shawl—all I need is a plane ticket south!

SPARKLE SHAWL
-Approx. 19” wide x 58” long (unblocked)
-1 skein of Lion Brand Shawl in a Ball (5.3 oz./150 g/481 yd/440 m) Prism
-6 mm crochet hook
-Yarn needle for weaving in ends

INSTRUCTIONS
Ch 83.

Row 1: Dc in fifth ch from hook (4 skipped chs count as dc + ch 1), *ch 3, skip next 5 chs, (dc, ch 2, dc) in next ch; repeat from * to last 6 chs, ch 3, skip next 5 chs, (dc, ch 1, dc) in last ch.

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), turn, dc in first ch-1 space, *ch 3, skip next ch-3 space, (dc, ch 2, dc) in next ch-2 space; repeat from * to last ch-3 space, ch 3, skip last ch-3 space, (dc, ch 1, dc) in beginning ch-sp.

Repeat Row 2 until you’ve used up most of your yarn. Fasten off.

OPTIONAL: I made 4 tassels to place in each corner of the shawl. I’d never made a tassel before, so I watched this video and it was a big help: https://knitting-crochet.wonderhowto.com/how-to/make-tassel-0129500/In looking for something that was the right size to wind my yarn around, I discovered that using the cardboard cover of a pack of Dentyne Ice gum is a perfect tool for making tassels! (Don’t you just love discovering unconventional uses for household items?)To make my tassels, I wound my Prism yarn around the Dentyne cover (lengthwise) 20 times. Then I followed the exact process in the video example.Then, just to take it a little further, I chose four glass beads that I wanted to incorporate; and threaded each bead to the top of each tassel, then fastened each beaded tassel to each corner of my shawl. It was a bit fiddly, but I like the extra glitter. I tied a lot of knots to make sure each was securely fastened.

Your luggage will stand out from the rest with these pretty crocheted flowers!

I made these cute flowers to attach to my luggage to make it more identifiable on the airport carousel. You could probably also use them as key rings, attach them to sneakers or jacket buttons, etc. Whatever your intentions, you’ll enjoy making them! They’re quick to make, and a good project for beginners.I found this great pattern for Travel Blooms at the wonderful Fiber Flux blog: http://www.fiberfluxblog.com/2013/06/free-crochet-patterntravel-blooms.html

To make mine, I used Bernat Handicrafter cotton in different colours, then sewed a little pearl in the center to embellish.

My little dolly is tutu cute!

I was playing with the versatile Bernat Handicrafter cotton yarn and made this little doll, just because.

I didn’t write out the pattern as I went along, but if you can crochet in simple rounds, then you can make her too. She doesn’t have to be perfect—experiment and make her any size you like.

Materials:
• Bernat Handicrafter cotton in hot pink, orange and yellow (or any choice of colours)
• 3.75 mm crochet hook
• Yarn needle for sewing
• Scrap yellow yarn for the hair
• Fiberfill stuffing
Optional: scrap of fabric netting to make the tutu

Instructions:

Head: Using yellow cotton, ch 4 and make a ring;

Round 1: 4 sc in ring (use a marker and crochet in continuous rounds)

Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around (8 sc)

Round 3: 2 sc in first sc, sc in each of next 2 sc,
*2 sc in next, sc in next 2; rep * around

Round 4: 2 sc in first sc, sc in each of next 3 sc,
*2 sc in next, sc in next 3; rep * around

Rounds 5 & 6: sc in each sc around

Round 7: start decreasing rounds: *sc dec in first 2 sc, sc in next sc,
rep * around. Stuff head as much as you can, then continue rounds.

Rounds 8-10: Keep decreasing around until you can slip stitch opening closed. When you fasten off, leave a long tail for sewing head to the body.

Body: Start out same as the head, but increase more and add more rows of sc to make bigger and fatter. I did half the body in hot pink and the other half in orange.

Legs: I used yellow for the first few rounds, then variegated pink and orange for the rest of the legs. Start out same as the head, just make sure to only increase in the first couple of rounds so you’ll make tube shapes instead of ball shapes, add more even rounds of sc to make the shape longer, and then start decreasing when the legs are long enough. When you fasten off, leave a long enough tail on each leg to sew to the body.

Arms: Same as the legs, just shorter. I made half the arm orange, the other half pink.

Use yarn needle and yarn tail to sew arms, legs and head onto body.

Hair: Using the yellow scrap yarn, I cut many lengths of about 5”. Then I started at the top of the head and, using the yarn needle, pulled a piece of yarn through and around one sc, made them even, then tied a knot around the sc. I did that with each piece of yarn until I’d covered the top and most of the back of the head. I cut shorter pieces and did the same process at the front to make bangs. Then I pulled through about 6 pieces at the top and tied a piece of pink yarn around them to make a little ponytail that sticks up. Once finished, I trimmed the “hair” so the back would be relatively even. But I didn’t expect it to be perfect, so the hair is a little choppy in areas. She’s perfectly cute even if she isn’t perfect!

Face: I used size 3 crochet cotton thread in dark grey and red. First, I used the grey to make two French knots for eyes (wound it around the needle a good three times so the eyes would be prominent). Then I used the red to stitch on her mouth.

Optional tutu: I was impatient to finish her off at this point, so I didn’t sew this as neatly as I should have. Anyway, I just cut a piece of fabric netting a bit larger than the width of her tummy. Then I folded over the top about a quarter inch and stitched it down with a needle and thread so that it left a pocket along the top that I could run a piece of yarn through. I also roughly seamed together the back ends. Then I used my yarn needle to run the yarn around the top, pulled the tutu up to her waist, and tied the yarn in a bow, which made the tutu gather at the waist.

Hope these instructions are clear enough. As I said earlier, if you can crochet in rounds, then you won’t have any problems making this doll.

Keep warm with these two Crocheted Hoodie Scarf patterns

1When you live in a climate that requires dressing to stay warm from November to March, a hoodie scarf becomes one of your most treasured pieces of outdoor clothing!

A hoodie scarf is easy enough for a beginner to work on, as it’s basically just a long, wide scarf folded in half and seamed down from the fold on one side to create a hood. It’s both a hat and scarf in one handy piece.

Since a hoodie scarf is simply a big rectangle, you can experiment by using any of your favorite stitch designs, as long as you make your initial chain wide enough to create a proper hood. It’s a really fun project to work on—you can mix colors and patterns, combine different types of chunky yarn, and it doesn’t take long to complete!

2I’ve supplied very basic instructions so you can experiment with two different types of hoodie scarf.

As a basic guideline, my hoodie scarves are approximately 50″ long x 10.5″ wide.

For the Two-Textured Rose pattern, each 25″ side is crocheted in a different stitch design.

The scarf was crocheted in one piece and then folded in half, with the fold made where the two different stitch designs meet each other.

Two-Textured Rose Hoodie Scarf 

Materials:

  • One ball of Phentex Worsted yarn, Light Old Rose (14 oz/400g/ 867 yds/792m)
  • 5 mm crochet hook
  • Six ¾” rose-colored buttons
  • Sewing needle and pink thread for sewing on buttons

3First side (Texture 1): Ch 43

Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch across.

Row 2: ch 2, skip 1st st, *(sc, dc) in next st, sk next st,
rep from* across, sc in last st, turn.

Repeat Row 2 until piece is approx. 25 inches long. Don’t fasten off.

Second side (Texture 2):
Continue crocheting, but working in a different pattern.

Row 1: Ch 1, sc in each st across, turn.4

Row 2: Ch 3, sk 1 st, *3 dc in next st, sk 1 st, 1 dc in next st, sk 1 st,
rep from* across to last 3 sts, 3 dc in next st, sk next st, dc in last st, turn.

Repeat Row 2 until this second half is the same length as the first half, or approx. 25 inches long.

Finish final edge with a row of sc in each stitch/space across. Fasten off and weave in yarn end.

Lay scarf out flat with right side facing you, and then fold scarf in half, placing right sides together (where Texture 1 ends and Texture 2 begins) so that you’re now working with the wrong sides.

5To seam back of hood: At left side, starting from fold, measure 10.5″ down; place a marker through both scarf edges. Using crochet hook and same color yarn, use slip stitch to seam sides together from fold to marker. Fasten off and weave in yarn end.

To make front hood edging: Turn hood/scarf inside out to the right side, which is where you’ll be working now. The edges opposite to the hood seam will be the front edges of the hood. On the left side of the front hood edge, place a marker 10.5″ down from the fold (same distance down where your hood seam ends), then measure the same distance down on the right side and place a marker there.6

In the marked space on the left side, connect your yarn with a slip stitch; dc in the next space and in each space around until you reach the marked space on the right side. Slip stitch into that marked space, and then fasten off and weave in yarn end. Because there are different stitch patterns on either side of the hood, just try to dc as uniformly as you can in the spaces you have to work with.

You can also do a shell edging instead of the plain dc—simply start with your slip stitch, then *dc in the next space, skip a space, 3 dc in the next space, skip a space, and repeat from * around, ending with a dc and then a slip stitch in the last marked space.

Front buttons: (working on the right side) Placing a marker about 3.5″ down from the front edging on the right side of the scarf, I sewed six ¾” buttons, evenly spaced apart, from the marked space to the bottom of the scarf. The texturing of the left side scarf edge allowed for natural “buttonholes” that fit neatly over the buttons so that the scarf can be securely buttoned from under your chin to down over your chest, and will lie nice and flat under a buttoned-up coat.

chunky-hoodie2Warm & Fuzzy Infinity Hoodie Scarf

This was actually just an experiment in using two completely different types of yarn together (both chunky) and it turned out with wonderful results! You can try using the same pattern with two types of any chunky yarn.

This is how I did it:

Materials: One ball of super bulky Red Heart Light & Lofty yarn in Beachy Keen (4.5 oz/127g/105 yds/96m); One ball of Bernat Roving yarn in Taupe (100g /3.5 oz/109m/120 yds)chunky-hoodie1

6.5 mm crochet hook

Finished width: 10.5″ / Finished length: approx. 62″

Use any stitch pattern you like to achieve the above dimensions.

I used the Roving yarn until the ball ran out (with just enough left for sewing the hood seam), which created a piece that approx. measured 40″, then I continued with the Red Heart Light & Lofty and continued in the same stitch pattern until that ball ran out (with just enough left to seam together the scarf ends to make it into an infinity), which gave me another 22″.

chunky-hoodie3I used this simple v-stitch pattern for the entire scarf:

#1. Chain until you have a 10.5″ width + 2 extra chains.

#2. Turn, sc in second chain and in each across. Turn.

#3. Ch 3, skip 2 spaces, *single v-stitch (1 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in next space, sk 2 spaces, double v-stitch (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in next space, skip 2 spaces, repeat from * across and end row with: single v-stitch, skip 2 spaces, dc in last space, turn.

chunky-hoodie4Repeat #3 for entire until first ball of yarn runs out, attach second yarn ball, and continue with the same pattern until it runs out.

You’re going to make sure that the hood is made from the longer (40″/Roving) portion of the scarf. To do this, fold your scarf (right sides together) so that the row where you fastened the second type of yarn is 10″ below the fold. Using the leftover piece of Roving yarn, seam both edges of one side together to form the hood.

Then, using the piece of leftover Red Heart yarn, seam together the two scarf ends so that it becomes an infinity.

chunky-hoodie6I never bothered with any edging because with the yarn being so chunky, it doesn’t seem to need any, but feel free to add some single-crochet edging around if you so desire.

Now, try on your new hoodie scarf. You can wear the infinity part loose, or twist and wrap it around your neck to the back of the hood, which will keep your neck extra warm. Enjoy!chunky-hoodie7

chunky-hoodie5

Cutie patootie baby booties

When I’m in the middle of a large crochet project that I’m getting bored baby_booties kimono1with but do want to finish eventually, I’ll take a break away to play with an easy side project that I know will give me quick results.

Baby booties are that kind of project.

These were beyond easy, and I’ve provided the free pattern link below, compliments of Eftychia and her Happiness Crafty blog:
http://happinesscrafty.blogspot.ca/2014/11/simple-baby-booties-free-crochet-pattern.html

baby_booties kimono2Make some to donate to a children’s charity or to have on hand for shower gifts.

Or just because they’re so damn cute. 🙂

%d bloggers like this: