Crocheted infinity cowl scarf with a surprise pocket

I bought some fine yarn in grey and two shades of purple, and had an urge to use it to make some squares. This infinity cowl scarf is what evolved. I made 14 Box in a Box squares (pattern below) and one Flower in the Middle square (pattern also below) which I placed on top of one Box in a Box square to make the pocket. To be honest, I’ve found the pocket to be a bit awkward while wearing the cowl, so if I were to do this again, I’d just skip adding the pocket. Or it may work better if you added a couple of snap closures so it stays closed.

You can choose to make your cowl using 14 Box in a Box squares; or instead, use 14 Flower in the Middle squares; or you can mix things up and use 7 Box in a Box and 7 Flower in the Middle squares together. Whichever ones you use, I guarantee it will look nice when you’re finished.

Here are the square patterns:

Box in a Box Square

  • 5 mm crochet hook
  • Craft Knitting Yarn (picked up at the Dollar Store!) (3-4 mm/100 g/100% acrylic)
    2 balls Grey, 1 ball Dark Purple, 1 ball Light Purple
  • Yarn needle for weaving in ends

Square is approx. 6” x 6”, blocked.

Pattern:

Using dark purple, Ch 4, join with a sl st to make a ring.

Round 1: In ring: ch 3, 2 dc, *(ch 3, 3 dc), rep from * 2 more times, ch 3; use sl st to join.

Round 2: Ch 3, sk next dc, dc in next dc, (2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in corner, dc in next dc, sk dc, dc in next dc; rep around; sl st to join. Fasten off purple and attach grey in same sp.

Round 3: Ch 3, dc in each of next 3 dc; *(2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in corner, dc in next 3 dc, ch 1, dc in next 3 dc, rep around, sl st to join.

Round 4: Ch 3, dc in next 5 dc, (2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in corner, dc in next 5 dc, ch 1, dc in next 5 dc, (2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in corner, rep around, sl st to join.

Round 5: Ch 3, dc in next 7 dc, (2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in corner, dc in next 7 dc, ch 1, dc in next 7 dc, (2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in corner, rep around, sl st to join.

Round 6: Ch 3, dc in next 9 dc, (2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in corner, dc in next 9 dc, ch 1, dc in next 9 dc, (2 dc, ch 3, 2 dc) in corner, rep around, sl st to join, fasten off and weave in end.

Seam together 2 rows of 7 squares each, alternating the dark and light purple centers. Then seam the 2 rows together, also taking care to alternate the colours. To make it an infinity, seam both ends together.

Optional Pocket: Make one Flower in the Middle square using the pattern below. Using a yarn needle and grey yarn, sew it along three sides over top of one of the squares in the upper row of your scarf, so that it forms a pocket.

Flower in the Middle square

Same materials as used for the Box in a Box square

Pattern:

Using dark purple, Ch 4, join with a sl st to make a ring.

Round 1: ch 3 (counts as first dc), 15 dc in ring. Sl st to join. Fasten off and attach light purple in any dc.

Round 2: ch 4, sk 1 dc, sc in top of next dc, (ch 3, sk 1 dc, sc in top of next dc) 6 times, ch 3, sk 1 dc, sl st to close.

Round 3: (hdc, dc, 2 tr, dc, hdc, sl st) in first ch-3 sp, rep in next 7 ch-3 sps. Sl st to close. (8 petals made) Fasten off light purple and attach grey in middle tr of any petal.

Round 4: (ch 7, sl st into tr of next petal) around, sl st to close.

Round 5: sl st in first ch-7 sp, ch 3, (5 dc, ch 2, 6 dc) in same ch-sp, 6 hdc in next ch-7 sp, (6 dc, ch 2, 6 dc) in next ch-7 sp, rep around, 6 hdc in last ch-7 sp, sl st to close.

Round 6: ch 3 in ch-sp, (dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in same ch-sp, dc in next 18 sts, (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in next ch-sp, rep 3 times, 18 dc in next 18 sts, sl st to close.

Round 7: ch 1 in same st as sl st, sc in next st, (2 sc, ch 2, 2 sc) in ch-sp, sc in each of next 22 sts, (2 sc, ch 2, 2 sc) in next ch-sp, rep 3 times, sc in each of next 20 sts, sl st to close. Fasten off and weave in end.

My pattern will be featured at ALLFREECROCHET.COM

I just received news that my pattern from yesterday’s post will be featured at one of my favourite crochet sites, ALLFREECROCHET.COM. You can see it here: https://www.allfreecrochet.com/Scarves/Hoodie-Scarf-Pattern

#FaveCrafter

Keep warm with these two Crocheted Hoodie Scarf patterns

1When you live in a climate that requires dressing to stay warm from November to March, a hoodie scarf becomes one of your most treasured pieces of outdoor clothing!

A hoodie scarf is easy enough for a beginner to work on, as it’s basically just a long, wide scarf folded in half and seamed down from the fold on one side to create a hood. It’s both a hat and scarf in one handy piece.

Since a hoodie scarf is simply a big rectangle, you can experiment by using any of your favorite stitch designs, as long as you make your initial chain wide enough to create a proper hood. It’s a really fun project to work on—you can mix colors and patterns, combine different types of chunky yarn, and it doesn’t take long to complete!

2I’ve supplied very basic instructions so you can experiment with two different types of hoodie scarf.

As a basic guideline, my hoodie scarves are approximately 50″ long x 10.5″ wide.

For the Two-Textured Rose pattern, each 25″ side is crocheted in a different stitch design.

The scarf was crocheted in one piece and then folded in half, with the fold made where the two different stitch designs meet each other.

Two-Textured Rose Hoodie Scarf 

Materials:

  • One ball of Phentex Worsted yarn, Light Old Rose (14 oz/400g/ 867 yds/792m)
  • 5 mm crochet hook
  • Six ¾” rose-colored buttons
  • Sewing needle and pink thread for sewing on buttons

3First side (Texture 1): Ch 43

Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch across.

Row 2: ch 2, skip 1st st, *(sc, dc) in next st, sk next st,
rep from* across, sc in last st, turn.

Repeat Row 2 until piece is approx. 25 inches long. Don’t fasten off.

Second side (Texture 2):
Continue crocheting, but working in a different pattern.

Row 1: Ch 1, sc in each st across, turn.4

Row 2: Ch 3, sk 1 st, *3 dc in next st, sk 1 st, 1 dc in next st, sk 1 st,
rep from* across to last 3 sts, 3 dc in next st, sk next st, dc in last st, turn.

Repeat Row 2 until this second half is the same length as the first half, or approx. 25 inches long.

Finish final edge with a row of sc in each stitch/space across. Fasten off and weave in yarn end.

Lay scarf out flat with right side facing you, and then fold scarf in half, placing right sides together (where Texture 1 ends and Texture 2 begins) so that you’re now working with the wrong sides.

5To seam back of hood: At left side, starting from fold, measure 10.5″ down; place a marker through both scarf edges. Using crochet hook and same color yarn, use slip stitch to seam sides together from fold to marker. Fasten off and weave in yarn end.

To make front hood edging: Turn hood/scarf inside out to the right side, which is where you’ll be working now. The edges opposite to the hood seam will be the front edges of the hood. On the left side of the front hood edge, place a marker 10.5″ down from the fold (same distance down where your hood seam ends), then measure the same distance down on the right side and place a marker there.6

In the marked space on the left side, connect your yarn with a slip stitch; dc in the next space and in each space around until you reach the marked space on the right side. Slip stitch into that marked space, and then fasten off and weave in yarn end. Because there are different stitch patterns on either side of the hood, just try to dc as uniformly as you can in the spaces you have to work with.

You can also do a shell edging instead of the plain dc—simply start with your slip stitch, then *dc in the next space, skip a space, 3 dc in the next space, skip a space, and repeat from * around, ending with a dc and then a slip stitch in the last marked space.

Front buttons: (working on the right side) Placing a marker about 3.5″ down from the front edging on the right side of the scarf, I sewed six ¾” buttons, evenly spaced apart, from the marked space to the bottom of the scarf. The texturing of the left side scarf edge allowed for natural “buttonholes” that fit neatly over the buttons so that the scarf can be securely buttoned from under your chin to down over your chest, and will lie nice and flat under a buttoned-up coat.

chunky-hoodie2Warm & Fuzzy Infinity Hoodie Scarf

This was actually just an experiment in using two completely different types of yarn together (both chunky) and it turned out with wonderful results! You can try using the same pattern with two types of any chunky yarn.

This is how I did it:

Materials: One ball of super bulky Red Heart Light & Lofty yarn in Beachy Keen (4.5 oz/127g/105 yds/96m); One ball of Bernat Roving yarn in Taupe (100g /3.5 oz/109m/120 yds)chunky-hoodie1

6.5 mm crochet hook

Finished width: 10.5″ / Finished length: approx. 62″

Use any stitch pattern you like to achieve the above dimensions.

I used the Roving yarn until the ball ran out (with just enough left for sewing the hood seam), which created a piece that approx. measured 40″, then I continued with the Red Heart Light & Lofty and continued in the same stitch pattern until that ball ran out (with just enough left to seam together the scarf ends to make it into an infinity), which gave me another 22″.

chunky-hoodie3I used this simple v-stitch pattern for the entire scarf:

#1. Chain until you have a 10.5″ width + 2 extra chains.

#2. Turn, sc in second chain and in each across. Turn.

#3. Ch 3, skip 2 spaces, *single v-stitch (1 dc, ch 1, 1 dc) in next space, sk 2 spaces, double v-stitch (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) in next space, skip 2 spaces, repeat from * across and end row with: single v-stitch, skip 2 spaces, dc in last space, turn.

chunky-hoodie4Repeat #3 for entire until first ball of yarn runs out, attach second yarn ball, and continue with the same pattern until it runs out.

You’re going to make sure that the hood is made from the longer (40″/Roving) portion of the scarf. To do this, fold your scarf (right sides together) so that the row where you fastened the second type of yarn is 10″ below the fold. Using the leftover piece of Roving yarn, seam both edges of one side together to form the hood.

Then, using the piece of leftover Red Heart yarn, seam together the two scarf ends so that it becomes an infinity.

chunky-hoodie6I never bothered with any edging because with the yarn being so chunky, it doesn’t seem to need any, but feel free to add some single-crochet edging around if you so desire.

Now, try on your new hoodie scarf. You can wear the infinity part loose, or twist and wrap it around your neck to the back of the hood, which will keep your neck extra warm. Enjoy!chunky-hoodie7

chunky-hoodie5

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